Zimbabwe

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On 6 June 2011, the Republic of Zimbabwe joined the SUN Movement with a letter of commitment from the Director of the Food and Nutrition Council. At the time, Zimbabwe had prioritised nutrition at the highest level with the Food and Nutrition Security Policy and established a Food and Nutrition council to convene cross-sector stakeholders.

Progress

Bringing people together
70% 2016

Bringing people together

Coherent policy and legal framework
79% 2016

Coherent policy and legal framework

Aligning programs around a Common Results Framework
65% 2016

Aligning programs around a Common Results Framework

Financial tracking and resource mobilization
45% 2016

Financial tracking and resource mobilization

TOTAL
65% 2016

TOTAL

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Nutrition situation

27.6%

Under Five Stunting

10.1%

Low Birth Weight

41%

0-5 Months Exclusive Breastfeeding

3.3%

Under Five Wasting

3.6%

Under Five Overweight

28.4%

Woman Anaemia 15-49 years

4.6%

Adult Blood Glucose (Diabetes)

30.7%

Adult Overweight

10.5%

Adult Obesity

Strategic objectives

Multi-stakeholder Food and Nutrition Security Committees (FNSCs) are functioning at the national and district level. The FNSCs have enabled 8 Provincial FNSCs in the establishment of district committees in 33 out of 60 districts. The community-based multi-sectoral approach for food and nutrition security has ensured the establishment of 118 ward Food and Nutrition Security Committees. SUN networks have been established and function well, with a need to further engage the academic and research community and formalise a business network.

Last updated: December 2016

2015
The Food and Nutrition Council (FNC) is the national agency mandated to lead the coordination, analysis and promotion of a multi-sectoral response to food and nutrition insecurity. It engages multiple ministries, United Nations (UN) agencies, civil society and the business sector. The FNC also convenes and coordinates the National Food and Nutrition Security Committee (NFNSC) and the newly formed High Level Food and Nutrition Security Advisory Group (FNSAG) which had its first meeting in March 2015. Ministries of Gender, Social Welfare and Youth recently joined these coordination structures and a draft roadmap for SUN has been developed to chart the way forward for all the members in the platform.
In order to effectively decentralise efforts of the FNC, Food and Nutrition Security Council’s (FNSC’s) have been established in all ten Provinces of Zimbabwe. Below this, 26 out of 60 Districts have FNSC’s. Municipal wards are the lowest administrative unit, and a pilot project is currently establishing FNSC’s at this level. If successful, this will be scaled up by the end of 2015.

The Zimbabwe Civil Society Network (ZCSOSUNA) has raised its constituency from 21 to 100 members and established five regional offices in just one year. Their latest activities were focused on engaging with parliamentarians and the media to highlight their role in strengthening nutrition. The Donor and UN Networks are drafting Terms of Reference and they have respectively nominated the European Union and UNICEF/FAO as conveners.

Finally, a breakfast meeting was organised with support from all SUN Networks to demonstrate the importance of nutrition to business. It led to the identification of a private sector focal point who has so far gathered interest from 32 food companies to join national efforts for nutrition.

Last updated: October 2015

The National Food and Nutrition Security Policy, launched in 2013, is the overarching framework for nutrition in Zimbabwe. Efforts to further engage parliamentarians to ensure the Government honours their commitments, as per this Policy, have been made. The Zimbabwe Civil Society Alliance (ZCSOSUNA) helps ensure that the voices of local communities are taken into account in national and global financial, legal, programmatic and political commitment to scale up nutrition. More work is needed to ensure proper follow up to implement existing national policies.

Last updated: December 2016

2015
The Right to Food is ensured in the 2013 Constitution. Nutrition legislation includes the Infant and Young Child Feeding policy and the Food Fortification strategy, both adopted in 2015. The Office of the President’s lead on nutrition policy analysis has led to nutrition-sensitive strategies being included in national development (ZimASSET); Agriculture (ZAIP) and Social protection (Social protection framework validated in 2015). The National Food and Nutrition Security Policy (NFNSP) launched in May 2013 is being disseminated at provincial and district levels.
Zimbabwe is also finalising a Nutrition Communication for Development Strategy.

Last updated: October 2015

In April 2015 the National Nutrition Strategy – the SUN Common Results Framework – was launched. The tracking of the implementation of the Common Results Framework is ongoing through the Committees. A comprehensive food and nutrition security information system is being developed to track progress of indicators and the Multi-Stakeholder Platform intends to conduct a joint mapping exercise and develop a database of who is doing what and where. Networks generally align actions to national priorities outlined in policies and strategies.

Last updated: December 2016

2015
The National Nutrition Strategy (2014-2018), which is the Common Results Framework (CRF), was drawn from the wider NFSNSP and its implementation matrix. It has been under development since 2013 and was finalised and launched by the Vice-President in April 2015. The Strategy is guiding the implementation of nutrition specific and sensitive interventions around six key result areas, clearly mentioning targets, activities and implementers. Provincial and District FNSCs are to develop annual work plans aligned to NFNSP, ZimASSET and NNS, detailing actions they will undertake in food and nutrition. To implement these, a multi-sectoral community-based model program for addressing stunting has started in vulnerable districts and key actors are aligning large-scale programmes which implement direct and indirect nutrition interventions to this model. This includes the Amalima project (2014- 2019), the Livelihoods and Food Security Program 2014-2018 (LFSP) and Enhancing Nutrition, Stepping Up Resilience and Enterprise (ENSURE) programs (2014-2019).
The NNS has a monitoring and evaluation framework which includes baseline values, impact indicators and targets, for each expected result and the data sources. These are to be embedded within the National Food and Nutrition Security Information System which is currently under design, to ensure a consistent and harmonised approach to reporting.

Last updated: October 2015

The National Nutrition Strategy is costed and estimates the financial resources needed to address the six key thematic areas during the period 2014-2018. Mapping on current spending still requires substantial analysis to identify both nutrition-specific and sensitive interventions which contribute to specific key result areas and national nutrition commitments. There is need to strengthen resource mobilisation for the Government and development partners, to address financial shortfalls in the nutrition sector.

Last updated: December 2016

2015
The NNS was costed through a multi-stakeholder consensus, with yearly requirements for each Key Result Area and each activity but the cost sharing is not elaborated yet. Mapping of spending is still at early stages and tracking of nutrition sensitive interventions is still a challenge.
Sustained and increased financial commitments by all actors including the private sector are aligned to the NFNSP and a pooled donor fund is helping to strengthen the effectiveness of nutrition interventions.
Last updated: October 2015

SUN Government Focal Point

George KEMBO
Director, National Food and Nutrition Council

Tatenda MAFUNGO
Assistant IPO, National Food and Nutrition Council (Technical Focal Point)

Donor Convenor

  • EU